“More precious than diamonds”: Myleene Klass shows off a ring made from her own breast milk

“More precious than diamonds”: Myleene Klass shows off a ring made from her own breast milk

For generations families have made do with old photos and maybe a keepsake box to remind them of the kids growing up.

This world, however, seems to be fading fast as technology makes it possible to create exotic memories from the most unlikely sources.

Among those benefiting is 44-year-old musician and radio host Myleene Klass.

As a longtime champion of breastfeeding, Miss Klass took her enthusiasm one step further by having a ring made from her own milk.

She showed off the white gem in an Instagram video detailing the process behind the unusual keepsake.

As a long-time breastfeeding champion, Miss Klass took her enthusiasm one step further by having a ring made from her own milk.

“Turns out there is a gem more precious than diamonds,” the mother-of-three wrote.

The £279 9ct gold bracelet with a titanium white finish was made by casting and memorabilia company Tiny Treasures.

Customers are asked to send 10ml of breast milk “for setting into jewelry of your choice”.

The milk is boiled, then a preservative is added to remove the moisture. After the milk is powdered, glitter drops are added for color.

Customers are asked to send 10ml of breast milk

Customers are asked to send 10ml of breast milk “to put in jewelry of your choice”

Miss Klass has daughters Ava, 14, and Hero, 11, with ex-husband Graham Quinn. She also has two-year-old son Apollo with partner Simon Motson.

In a defense of breastfeeding in public, she once wrote, “My body, my baby, my choice. I have been breastfeeding Apollo for months. He’s my miracle baby. This is part of our link. I love doing it for him.

She added: “Being a mum is hard enough. Apparently everyone knows how to raise your baby except you.

The milk is boiled then a preservative is added to remove the moisture

After the milk is ground into a powder, glitter drops are added for color

The milk is boiled, then a preservative is added to remove the moisture. After the milk is ground into a powder, glitter drops are added for color

Sarah C. Figueiredo